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    • J. Grant Brittain Del Mar Newspaper

      Reported by Arkitip, Inc., 4 May 2015, 22:44 PM

      It is with great pride that we announce our second project with J. Grant Brittain. We’ve blown up the format to Newspaper size, perfect for thumb-tacking to your walls. This collection is replete with inspirational moments, in a size that befits their ingenuity.

      While working at the Del Mar Skateboard Ranch in 1979 selling Cokes, Twinkies and miniature golf, J. Grant Brittain borrowed his roommate’s Canon and began what would become a 36 year-long affair with skateboarding, cameras and magazines. He helped found Transworld Skateboarding magazine in 1983 and as the Photo Editor for 20 years, helped build it into the top selling skateboarding mag. He has captured the best skateboarders of the last three decades in photos that have become classics. He has also taught some of the best skate photographers past and present and has helped them develop their own work. Grant felt like he was in a well worn rut and has moved on and helped start another magazine in 2003, The Skateboard Mag where he resides to this day.

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      His “off hours” are consumed by a search for calmer and more serene subjects. Still lakes at night and solitary desert forms are among the subjects of his diverse personal work. His abstracts, portraits, landscapes and travel images seem to draw from the opposite energy of his action shots. Few photographers have pursued so wide a range of subjects and styles. But few individuals find themselves so central to such an active community, where one’s perspective is just a notch askew of the rest, and where movement and progression is the norm. Grant Brittain’s body of work reflects his deep involvement in an emerging youth culture, as well as his escape from it.

      - Miki Vuckovich

      Featuring:
      J. Grant Brittain

      11 x 17 In. (27.94 x 43.18 cm)
      48 pages
      1 color, 30 lb. bright white newsprint
      Hand packaged in a limited edition of 500

      Further images can be found at the product page, this item is in stock and ready to ship.

      Thank you for the support.

    • Troublemakers

      Reported by Scott A. Sant'Angelo, 27 May 2015, 10:20 AM

      With Land Art being one of my favorite mediums, I am really looking forward to the release of this film.

      Troublemakers unearths the history of land art in the tumultuous late 1960s and early 1970s. The film features a cadre of renegade New York artists that sought to transcend the limitations of painting and sculpture by producing earthworks on a monumental scale in the desolate desert spaces of the American southwest. Today these works remain impressive not only for the sheer audacity of their makers but also for their out-sized ambitions to break free from traditional norms. The film casts these artists in a heroic light, which is exactly how they saw themselves. Iconoclasts who changed the landscape of art forever, these revolutionary, antagonistic creatives risked their careers on radical artistic change and experimentation, and took on the establishment to produce art on their own terms. The film includes rare footage and interviews which unveil the enigmatic lives and careers of storied artists Robert Smithson (Spiral Jetty), Walter De Maria (The Lightning Field) and Michael Heizer (Double Negative); a headstrong troika that established the genre. As the film makes clear, in making works that can never be possessed as an object in a gallery, these troublemakers stand in marked contrast to the hyper-speculative contemporary art world of today.

      Troublemakers points out that land art was rife with contradiction and conflict, a site where architecture, landscape, sculpture, technology, archaeology and photography would all converge. Against the backdrop of the Vietnam War, Cold War anxieties and other political uncertainties of the nuclear age, land artists often subscribed to a dystopian view of the future that questioned the military-industrial complex, consumerism and the banalities of modern life and culture.

    • The Desert Oracle

      Reported by Scott A. Sant'Angelo, 18 May 2015, 18:52 PM

      The Desert Oracle is a pocket-sized field guide to the fascinating American deserts: weird tales, ghost towns, wonderfully bizarre animals and plants, mysteries and folklore, national and state parks, slickrock arches, legends of lost mines and ships on the sand dunes, beloved authors and artists, and plenty of oddball desert characters from the past and the present.

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      Your companion at a roadside diner, around a campfire, or in your tent or cabin as the wind and the coyotes howl outside at night. It’s for national-park adventurers and adventurous locals, film buffs and ghost hunters, lovers of both natural history and human history.

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